Power Source Parenting: Program for At-Risk Teen Parents

03/02/20 0

Power Source Parenting: Growing Up Strong and Raising Healthy Kids is a practical, accessible, and innovative book/curriculum written for teen and young adult parents and the professionals who support them. It can be can be read by young parents on their own, or the concepts, exercises, and numerous firsthand stories by young parents can be introduced and explored in facilitated parenting groups or during individual home visits or counseling sessions.

Lionheart is committed to securing a loving start for children at risk and has donated 18,000 free copies of the book to more than 7,000 programs nationwide.

Among the topics included are:

  • Creating a healthy attachment to one’s child
  • Coping with the stress of parenting in adaptive ways
  • Implementing positive discipline practices
  • Managing three generational living
  • Establishing healthy relationships with partners
  • Breaking cycles of domestic violence
  • Bringing greater awareness to patterns of high-risk behavior and its effects on one’s children
  • A section for young fathers that addresses becoming a father in the wake of a fatherless   upbringing and helping young fathers identify possible contributions not contingent upon finances.

“I am very impressed with how genuine this book is. It is difficult to find reading material that connects with youth. Either the author tries too hard to connect making the book disingenuous. Or they alienate the young reader with a writing style they cannot relate to. Thank you for supporting us with this book that gets to the heart and soul of being a young parent in these times.”  TEENWORKS TEACHER,  CROSSROADS PREGNANCY RESOURCE CENTER

Bethany Casarjian, Ph.D., Clinical Director of Lionheart’s youth project, is the author of Power Source Parenting and the Power Source Parenting Facilitator’a Manual.  A Power Source Parenting Video Series will be available in the future.

Learn more:

Power Source Parenting Teen Parent Program

Power Source Parenting Research

 

The Lionheart Foundation’s State by State List of Reentry Support for Prisoners

29/01/20 0

Thousands of inmates are released each year without access to, or knowledge of, the support networks to help them transition back into society.  The Lionheart Foundation has compiled a list of reentry programs, listed by state, to help people connect with the services or contacts they might need.

CLICK HERE TO ACCESS THE LIST OF REENTRY PROGRAMS

Lionheart’s Program for At-Risk Teen Parents: Power Source Parenting: Growing Up Strong and Raising Healthy Children

29/01/20 0

Power Source Parenting is a theory-driven  intervention impacting the lives of thousands of teen parents as well as their children and future generations.

LEARN MORE ABOUT POWER SOURCE PARENTING

 

“At our monthly staff meeting yesterday, Power Source Parenting received rave reviews.  With no exceptions, all staff members had positive things to say about it.  Thank you and your organization (Lionheart) for this breath of”At our monthly staff meeting yesterday, Power Source Parenting Received rave reviews.  With no exceptions, all staff me fresh air!”  Executive Director, Teen Parenting Program

Lionheart’s  National Emotional Literacy Project for Youth-At-Risk consists of two major programs, Power Source (for at-risk and adjudicated youth) and Power Source Parenting (for at-risk teen parents.)

LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR YOUTH PROJECT

 

 

Lionheart’s Course for Prisoners in Solitary Confinement

29/01/20 0

In 2016, The Lionheart Foundation created The Houses of Healing Self-Study Course– The goal of this revised version of the Houses of Healing Program was to offer men and women in solitary a tool that would help minimize the harmful effects of solitary confinement while teaching skills and perspectives to empower them to take greater charge of their lives, participate in their own emotional well-being and healing, and move forward in a more positive way.

Learn more about programs at the Lionheart Foundation.

Houses of Healing Program in Solitary Confinement

27/01/20 0

The Houses of Healing Self-study Course for Prisoners in the SHU (14-sessions)

“This course has greatly impacted my life in a positive way.  I’ve taken several self-help courses.  I’ve been in solitary confinement for more than 15 years, but this course was unlike any other and made me look deeper into myself.  And it has most of all made me take time to pause and think, reflect upon life and past mistakes and errors, and then make a rational, logical, and wise choice.  Before I’d act or respond without thinking or worry of the consequences.”
SHU Prisoner

In 2016, Lionheart was awarded an “Innovative Grant” from the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) to design and bring the Houses of Healing Self-Study Course to prisoners in the CA Special Housing Units (SHUs) in Pelican Bay, CA State Prison – Corcoran, and the CA Correctional Institution (CCI) – all prisons with large isolation units. (In the past year the SHU in CCI has closed and the number of prisoners in the other SHUs is decreasing.) During the grant period (1/2016-6/2017), 464 prisoners voluntarily registered and participated in The Houses of Healing Self-study Course for Prisoners in the SHU. Course evaluations from 160 participants showed significant positive change and progress.

 

Pilot Data

Summary of evaluation feedback from 160 participants in the 14-session Houses of Healing Self-Study Course for Prisoners in the SHU.  464 men registered and received the course.  The evaluation response rate = 34.4%.

  • 93% of respondents reported being able to remain in control of their behavior when upset (“most of the time” or “almost always”), since taking the course, compared to 18% before the course, with 90% of individual respondents reporting improvement.
  • 86% of respondents reported being able to handle anger in a positive way, (“most of the time” or “almost always”), since taking the course, compared to 15% before the course, with 93% of individual respondents reporting improvement.
  • 91% of respondents reported using healthy ways to make themselves feel better when upset, (“most of the time” or “almost always”), since taking the course, compared to 13% before the course, with 89% of individual respondents reporting improvement.
  • 91% of respondents reported being aware of their “triggers” (people and circumstances that trigger an emotional reaction in oneself), (“most of the time” or “almost always”), since taking the course, compared to 18% before the course, with 89% of individual respondents reporting improvement.
  • 95% of respondents reported feeling hopeful about life (“most of the time” or “almost always”), since taking the course, compared to 29% before the course, with 83% of individual respondents reporting improvement.
  • 95% of respondents reported the ability to take responsibility for their actions, (“most of the time” or “almost always”), since taking the course, compared to 30% before the course, with 86% of individual respondents reporting improvement.
  • Among the emotional regulation techniques taught in the course are meditation and yoga. 78% reported that they meditated at least 3 times a week to almost every day. 50% reported that they practiced yoga from 3 times a week to almost every day.
  • 98% of respondents answered positively when asked how they would rate the course (with 90% rating the course as “very good” or “excellent”).
  • 100% of respondents stated that they would recommend the Houses of Healing Self-study Program to others.

Program Goals/Outcomes include:

  • Recognizing the importance of using time in segregation in a disciplined, constructive way
  • Learning and practicing mindfulness meditation, emotional self-regulation, and stress-management techniques
  • Nurturing a fundamental shift in self-identity to one that is strength-based
  • Learning cognitive reframing from cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • Acknowledging, working with, and healing childhood trauma
  • Transforming anger, resentment, and unhealthy guilt and shame
  • Understanding and practicing forgiveness
  • Acknowledging and healing grief
  • Acknowledging guilt and the impact of crime – taking responsibility for offending behavior – and increasing victim awareness
  • Learning/practicing some basics of physical exercise and yoga
  • Nurturing spiritual growth

Delivery of the Houses of Healing Self-study Course:

Due to the cost of delivering the self-study course ($70 per participant), it is available to prisoners in solitary ONLY in prisons where arrangements have been made with the prison administration beforehand. If Lionheart is not working with your prison system, we are not able to deliver the program there.

Lionheart’s out-of-pocket expenses for the book Houses of Healing: A Prisoner’s Guide to Inner Power and Freedom, 200 photocopied pages, envelopes, labels, and postage for 15 mailings are $58 per person. This does not include any administrative costs involved with coordinating and sending weekly sessions. The total cost is $70 per participant.

Learn more about Lionheart’s prison projects.

Lionheart Offers Emotional Literacy Programs to Prisoners and At-Risk Youth: So what is Emotional Literacy?

27/01/20 0

So what is emotional literacy? Emotional literacy is the ability to identify, manage, and express one’s emotions in a mature and conscientious manner. With this ability comes the capacity to empathize with the feelings of others.  Emotional literacy educational programs offered by the Lionheart Foundation are designed to foster self-understanding and social, emotional and spiritual growth; and encourage responsibility and accountability towards oneself and others.

Consequences resulting from a lack of social emotional learning (SEL) and the resultant lack of emotional literacy can be staggering… abusive behavior toward others or oneself; high levels of frustration, anger, sadness, and personal suffering; inept parenting, addictions of all sorts, and much physical dis-ease. Social emotional illiteracy is a pivotal factor underlying most crime. One of the clear indicators of emotional illiteracy among youth is the increased violence in American schools.

The good news is that emotional literacy skills can be learned at any time in life. Social emotional learning results in the ability to read one’s own feelings as well as the feelings of others. When people develop emotional literacy skills, they are better able to identify, express, and manage their feelings. There are greater options for effectively dealing with stress and tension. There is greater impulse control. There is heightened self-awareness and self-understanding. Social skills and the ability to communicate effectively are enhanced. Consequently, behaviors and attitudes that arise from emotional literacy skills support and reflect self-esteem, empathy toward others, and appropriate action in the world.

The cultivation of emotional intelligence nurtures and elicits the best in people. Knowing this, it surely makes good sense to offer the necessary resources to support emotional literacy for every prisoner, youth at risk and teen parent. In fact, most adults and all children can significantly benefit from the heightened emotional intelligence and resulting confidence gained through specific education in this domain.

Furthermore, if we truly want public safety, we must make social emotional learning a national priority. The National Emotional Literacy Projects for Prisoners and Youth-at-Risk offer unique, accessible, and powerful resources toward this end.

Find out more about Lionheart Programs.

New Lionheart Program: EQ2 for Direct Care Staff

22/01/20 0

EQ2Empowering Direct Care Staff to Build Trauma-Informed Communities for Youth

Using the term, emotion coaching, Lionheart’s EQ2 program begins by increasing staffs’ awareness of youth trauma behavior, helping staff build relationship-focused competencies and expanding crisis intervention knowledge. What is unique about the EQ2 approach, however, is the focus on building staff’s own social and emotional skills including increased awareness of their emotional state when working with youth to prevent crisis, learning personalized cognitive-behavioral strategies to help staff co-regulate with youth, learning how to return to “emotional baseline” after stressful incidents, and building stress management and resiliency skills to handle the emotional fallout that is common when working with trauma-impacted youth.

Click Here to Learn More.

Coming soon! EQ2: A Program for Direct Care Staff working with at-risk Youth.

20/01/20 0

EQ2: Empowering Direct Care Staff to Build Trauma-Informed Communities for Youth

Using the term, emotion coaching, Lionheart’s EQ2 program begins by increasing staffs’ awareness of youth trauma behavior, helping staff build relationship-focused competencies and expanding crisis intervention knowledge. What is unique about the EQ2 approach, however, is the focus on building staff’s own social and emotional skills including increased awareness of their emotional state when working with youth to prevent crisis, learning personalized cognitive-behavioral strategies to help staff co-regulate with youth, learning how to return to “emotional baseline” after stressful incidents, and building stress management and resiliency skills to handle the emotional fallout that is common when working with trauma-impacted youth.

Coming Soon: EQ2 a program to empower direct-care staff to build trauma informed communities for youth.

06/01/20 0

LEARN MORE/SIGN UP FOR NOTIFICATION OF PROGRAM RELEASE/VIEW EQ2 INFORMATIONAL VIDEO: https://lionheart.org/eq2/

EQ2 is a program designed to support direct-care staff working with high-risk, trauma-impacted youth, particularly those who are involved in the child welfare and juvenile detention systems. Experts increasingly understand that managing the traumatic stress reactions that system-involved youth often present with can take a profound toll on the well-being of residential staff and result in trauma symptoms which permeate the larger organization. Secondary trauma has been shown to lead to increased levels of staff stress, burnout, and turnover, as well as lowered quality of care for youth. Recently, calls for “trauma-informed systemic approaches” have been issued to help agencies respond to youth and staff trauma-related needs. Using the term, emotion coaching,

Using the term, emotion coaching, Lionheart’s EQ2 program begins by increasing staffs’ awareness of youth trauma behavior, helping staff build relationship focused competencies and expanding crisis intervention knowledge. What is unique about the EQ2 approach, however, is the focus on building staff’s own social and emotional skills including increased awareness of their emotional state when working with youth to prevent crisis, learning personalized cognitive behavioral strategies to help staff co-regulate with youth, learning how to return to “emotional baseline” after stressful incidents, and building stress management and resiliency skills to handle the emotional fallout that is common when working with trauma-impacted youth.

Agencies who sign up for the EQ2 Program will receive access to the EQ2 online learning platform; multiple copies of the printed version of the EQ2 Participant Handbook and annotated Facilitators Guide; the EQ2 app for staff, and a range of supportive materials to help build trauma-sensitive environments including posters and wristbands.

Lionheart’s Program for At-Risk Youth, Power Source, Distributed to Native American Tribes

18/12/19 0

Power Source: Lionheart’s evidence-based program for highly at-risk adolescents and young adults delivered to Native American tribes through donor-directed support.

As a result of two targeted donations, Lionheart has completed the second Power Source outreach to Native American tribes. Most had very little relevant programming and after seeing the review copy, there was enthusiastic interest in the program. As one program director responded, “it was a unanimous vote of WOW and yes, we need this.”  While another commented, “I think it will be perfect for our youth.”  Tribes and programs included Yankton Sioux Tribe – Child Welfare, SD; Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate – Dakotah Pride Center, SD; Crow Nation Recovery Center, MT; Tipi/Rosebud Juvenile Detention Center, SD; Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, WI; and the Kaw Nation, OK.

For more information about the Power Source Program:  Click Here

 Page 1 of 10  1  2  3  4  5 » ...  Last »